Douglas Adams on Sloths

“My absolute favourite piece of information is the fact that young sloths are so inept that they frequently grab their own arms and legs instead of tree limbs, and fall out of trees.” – Douglas Adams

Douglas Noel Adams (11 March 1952 – 11 May 2001) was an English author, scriptwriter, essayist, humorist, satirist and dramatist. (Wikipedia)

Photo: Feeding brown-throated three-toed sloth (Bradypus variegatus), Cahuita National Park, Costa Rica, by Christian Mehlführer, CC BY 2.5. (Source and license.)

Movie: All the President’s Men

“The truth is, these are not very bright guys, and things got out of hand.” – Deep Throat, “All the President’s Men” (Movie)

Bob Woodward: The story is dry. All we’ve got are pieces. We can’t seem to figure out what the puzzle is supposed to look like. John Mitchell resigns as the head of CREEP, and says that he wants to spend more time with his family. I mean, it sounds like bullshit, we don’t exactly believe that…

Deep Throat: No, heh, but it’s touching. Forget the myths the media’s created about the White House. The truth is, these are not very bright guys, and things got out of hand.


You can watch All the President’s Men at Google Play or Amazon (affiliate link, I need more stuff to read), and it’s worth the few bucks to rent or buy it – great movie, and unfortunately topical these days. You can also read the book (affiliate link). It’s a bit dry, but a good read.

‘Go Set A Watchman,’ Harper Lee

“But the white supremacists fear reason, because they know cold reason beats them. Prejudice, a dirty word, and faith, a clean one, have something in common: they both begin where reason ends.” – Harper Lee, Go Set a Watchman

Go Set A Watchman was the “sequel” to Harper Lee’s To Kill A Mockingbird. It was marketed as a sequel, that is, but it wasn’t, really. It was the first draft she wrote for To Kill A Mockingbird.

It does work as a sequel, sort of. And it’s a good book, a good read. But it absolutely ruins Atticus Finch as a character. It does so for the reader in the exact same way as it does for Scout, the character.

I was never sure what I thought of this book. I loved To Kill A Mockingbird. It’s one of my favorite books. Go Set A Watchman was certainly an interesting read, and it made me think a lot, so it’s got that going for it.

There was a lot of drama surrounding the publication of the book, and a lot of weirdness in the way the book was written. It doesn’t work at all without Mockingbird, but it was thought to be a first draft? Was Harper Lee taken advantage of in the publishing of the book? It’s hard to read the book and look past all that.

But despite the mess, it’s worth a read. I wouldn’t consider it… canon, exactly. More like, and alternative version of events, maybe?

Anyway, here’s a link to buy the book: Go Set A Watchman. That’s an affiliate link, FYI. If you buy it through there, I get a few cents, which will promptly be spent towards buying more books.

Ray Bradbury on Books

“There are worse crimes than burning books. One of them is not reading them.” – Ray Bradbury

“Ray Douglas Bradbury was an American author and screenwriter. He worked in a variety of genres, including fantasy, science fiction, horror, and mystery fiction.

“Widely known for his dystopian novel Fahrenheit 451 (1953), and his science-fiction and horror-story collections, The Martian Chronicles (1950), The Illustrated Man (1951), and I Sing the Body Electric (1969), Bradbury was one of the most celebrated 20th- and 21st-century American writers. While most of his best known work is in speculative fiction, he also wrote in other genres, such as the coming-of-age novel Dandelion Wine (1957) and the fictionalized memoir Green Shadows, White Whale (1992).” (Wikipedia)

Dr. Seuss on Caring

“Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, nothing is going to get better. It’s not.” – Dr. Seuss

“Theodor Seuss Geisel was an American children’s author, political cartoonist, poet, animator, screenwriter, filmmaker, and artist, best known for his work writing and illustrating more than 60 books under the pen name Doctor Seuss (abbreviated Dr. Seuss) His work includes many of the most popular children’s books of all time, selling over 600 million copies and being translated into more than 20 languages by the time of his death.” (Wikipedia)

Jim Butcher on Evil

“Most of the bad guys in the real world don’t know that they are bad guys. You don’t get a flashing warning sign that you’re about to damn yourself. It sneaks up on you when you aren’t looking.” – Jim Butcher, Proven Guilty

“There’s no love lost between Harry Dresden, the only wizard in the Chicago phone book, and the White Council of Wizards, who find him brash and undisciplined. But war with the vampires has thinned their ranks, so the Council has drafted Harry as a Warden and assigned him to look into rumors of black magic in the Windy City.

“As Harry adjusts to his new role, another problem arrives in the form of the tattooed and pierced daughter of an old friend—all grown up and already in trouble. Her boyfriend is the only suspect in what looks like a supernatural assault straight out of a horror film. Malevolent entities that feed on fear are loose in Chicago, but it’s all in a day’s work for a wizard, his faithful dog, and a talking skull named Bob..”

👆 Proven Guilty by Jim Butcher, part of his Dresden Files series. If you haven’t read ’em, you should, because they’re excellent. The first book in the series is Storm Front. You’re welcome.